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  • Gout

    Gout is often said to be the most painful form of arthritis. Symptoms include intensely painful, red, hot and swollen joints, and it most often affects the big toe.

  • What is gout?

    Gout is the most common type of inflammatory arthritis. Attacks usually come on very quickly, and this sudden onset of symptoms is known as an acute attack.

  • Gout

    Your stories about living with gout.

  • Gout

    Data and statistics on how common gout is and how it affects general practice in the UK.

  • Gout - it's no laughing matter

    If gout can be cured, why is it on the increase and why are so many people still suffering? A new Arthritis Research UK study may shed some light on why gout is still about – and how it can be treated more effectively.

  • Gout: common and curable?

    If gout is supposedly curable why are so many affected people still suffering? Experts Edward Roddy and Mike Doherty explain what gout is all about.

  • Gout on the front pages

    Gout is on the rise in the UK but continues to be managed as a series of acute attacks rather than as a curable metabolic condition...

  • Gout – a bowl of cherries, sir?

    The notion that consumption of cherries or cherry extract may help prevent episodes of gout has been around for some time. A recent paper from Boston offers early evidence to support this....

  • Updated gout guidelines

    Worryingly the prevalence of gout is increasing in many populations, due mainly to lifestyle issues, co-morbidities and longevity. Disappointingly the delivery and uptake of medical care for gout remains poor in many places – hence the need for a guideline update.

  • Clinical audit suggestions: gout

    Gout is one of the most common causes of inflamed joints and it is usually managed in primary care. Here are some useful links to national best practice guidelines and other sources of key information.

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