Close

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our site. Cookies are files stored in your browser and are used by most websites to help personalise your web experience.

By continuing to use our website without changing the settings, you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

Find out more
For more information, go to www.arthritisresearchuk.org

Arthritis Research UK Experimental Arthritis Treatment Centre - Glasgow

Award Details

  • Principal Investigator
    Professor Iain McInnes
  • Type of grant
    Experimental Arthritis Treatment Centre
  • Amount Awarded
    £187,500.00
  • Institute
    University of Glasgow
  • Location
    Glasgow
  • Status
    Active
  • Start Date
    01/07/2012
  • Grant reference number
    20024
  • Condition
    Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, Ankylosing spondylitis

What are the aims of this research?

This grant will support the creation of a new centre in Glasgow in which we will perform studies that aim to:

  1. Understand why arthritis occurs, and especially why it starts and why it does not get better on its own.
  2. Explore the ability of new medicines to improve different forms of arthritis
  3. Understand better how current medicines work in people with arthritis so that we can perhaps improve on these in the future. 
  4. Find new approaches that can predict which medicine will work best for an individual person.
  5. Form part of a network with similar centres throughout the United Kingdom with a view to providing a concerted effort to perform the best studies possible.

Why is this research important?

The last ten years have seen remarkable advances in the treatments available for people with arthritis.  With these advances however comes new expectation that we can do even better – to find new medicines and better approaches to their use that can lead us ever closer to a cure.  This will require that new studies are performed in a sophisticated manner that brings the best of medical technology (e.g. imaging like MRI and ultrasound) and biology together around the person participating in trials in a safe and convenient way.  This can best be achieved in a dedicated centre that has the necessary equipment and expertise. 

How will the findings benefit patients?

New medicines and strategies for treatment that arise from our centre, and from those with whom we form our network, will contribute directly to the improvement of patient care on a global basis. In due course we will bring new medicines to people with arthritis.  We will bring new tests that will be useful in predicting which medicines are right for which people at a given point in their disease and hopefully we will be able to avoid offering medicines that have a high chance of causing side effects.

For more information, go to www.arthritisresearchuk.org.
Arthritis Research UK fund research into the cause, treatment and cure of arthritis. You can support Arthritis Research UK by volunteering, donating or visiting our shops.