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What is the outlook for JIA?

Many children who have JIA won't have any symptoms when they're adults, but it’s not possible to accurately predict this. In most cases, childhood arthritis has a good outcome. You should look forward to a future that’s no different from those of your friends and classmates.

In at least 30% of cases, however, arthritis can remain active into adult life. Some young adults with JIA have joint damage that limits their daily activities to some extent and a few may need joint replacements. Other problems can sometimes occur. Some people are physically smaller than average or have osteoporosis as a result of their arthritis and/or treatment with steroids.

A successful outcome in JIA requires many things, including:

  • a positive approach
  • an experienced team working alongside your GP
  • a caring, helpful environment with support from family, friends and teachers.

You also need to know how to get help that you can understand, know who to approach and be confident enough to ask for support and advice.

Helpline

0800 5200 520

Our new helpline: Call us for free information, help and advice on your type of arthritis. Open Mon–Fri 9am–8pm.

All calls are recorded for training and quality purposes

Virtual Assistant

Our new Arthritis Virtual Assistant uses artificial intelligence to answer your arthritis related questions 24/7.

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For more information, go to www.arthritisresearchuk.org.
Arthritis Research UK fund research into the cause, treatment and cure of arthritis. You can support Arthritis Research UK by volunteering, donating or visiting our shops.