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> > > > What are the possible complications of foot and ankle surgery?

What are the possible complications of foot and ankle surgery?

If you’re generally healthy the risk of a serious complication from an operation is very small. Every possible care is taken to prevent complications, but in a few cases these do happen. For example, some people can develop an infection, so it’s important to speak to your doctor straight away for antibiotic treatment if you notice any signs, including:

  • increased pain
  • redness
  • the affected area feeling warmer than usual
  • an unpleasant smell.

Some people may have swelling and stiffness, but physiotherapists and occupational therapists can help with exercises and other advice.

Bleeding and wound haematoma

A wound haematoma is when blood collects in a wound. It’s normal to have a small amount of blood leak from the wound after any surgery, and usually this stops within a couple of days. But occasionally blood may collect under your skin, causing a swelling. This can cause a larger but temporary leakage from the wound usually a week or so after surgery, or it may require a smaller second operation to remove the blood collection. Drugs like aspirin and antibiotics can increase the risk of haematoma after surgery.

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